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Recently on Twitter, one of our followers asked if there was a resource for global age-friendly cities.  Well now there is! A new website has been launched this week to showcase the Age-friendly world.

Organized by the World Health Organization and International Federation on Ageing (IFA) this e-portal will become a central resources for developing, maintaining and improving Age-friendly cities.

This site is aimed at the general public and is free and easy to use, learn, share and discuss.  Just register and join a group that interests you.

The site sheds light on facts and figures, news-worthy updates, and allows you to engAGE in dialogue and discussions on any topic of interest.

For example, did you know that WHO Global Network of Age-friendly Cities and Communities has 103 members across 18 countries worldwide?  This site is a great means of keeping up-to-date on what’s going on across borders. What better way to help the elderly than by sharing ideas and insights.

Check out the new site and start a discussion. http://www.agefriendlyworld.org/

Sister Cities of LOS ANGELES

[Photo Credit: prayitno, Flickr]

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In 2006, the World Health Organization developed a project on “Age-Friendly Cities”.  The project was completed as a practical guide in 2007, but the results are far from over.  The checklist of essential features of age-friendly cities includes developments in:

WHO's age friendly cities

Key Areas for Age-Friendly Cities [credit: World Health Organization]

  •  Outdoor spaces and buildings
  •  Transportation 
  •  Housing
  •  Social Participation
  •  Respect and Social Inclusion
  •  Civic Participation and employment
  •  Communication and information

So five years later, who is in the running of the most age-friendly cities?

Singapore: In 2010, Dr. Kang Soon Hock issued an update via the Institute of Policy Studies on Singapore’s progress. Singapore has improved in major areas including smoother transitions from hospital to homes, introduction of universal design of buildings and a neat crosswalk that gives you the option for more time to cross!

Brussels: Brussels was named the first Age-friendly city and has since began to offer a 65+ travel pass for travel within Brussels and communes (homes for the elderly) run dedicated services for senior citizens in their respective areas. 

Ljubljana: One of the many accomplishments of Slovenia’s capital has been the creation of assertiveness programs for medical service users intended to enhance their rights to social security and health insurance. Mayor Zoran Jankovic also plans to improve transportation and make Ljubljana “the cleanest city in Europe.”

New York:  In 2009 the New York Mayor’s office together with various city departments came out with 59 initiatives that would enhance city living for older citizens. It was the first city to respond to WHO’s initiative.

Ireland’s Age Friendly Counties – The Ageing Well Network allows Ireland’s communities to participate in the development of caring communities.  It currently features eight age-friendly counties who all subscribe to WHO’s guidelines. CARDI (Centre for Ageing Research and Development in Ireland) issued a thorough report this month).

China is also making progress in improving its cities.  The Future City Initiative presented by Xuejin Zuo, (Tokyo, 2012) demonstrated some urban design concepts.  In August 2012, APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation) will host a conference in Taipei on age-friendly cities and age-friendly economics to show-off some more plans.

The French government announced recently that they will be accrediting communes who take good care of their elderly.  The program entitled Bien Vieillir [ageing well] encourages the communes to do an assessment of programs in place for the elderly, develop an action plan for meeting the needs of the elderly in the future and evaluating progress, as reported in The Connexion.

This is a good example of implementation of the goals outlined by the World Health Organization’s Age Friendly Environments Programme, an international effort to address the environmental and social factors that contribute to active and healthly ageing in societies.

About this blog

IAHSA’s Global Ageing Network Blog was created because of you!! We got your message loud and clear – “Provide us with a quick and nimble communications vehicle so we can stay connected and create community across borders".

Questions? Email us at iahsa@leadingage.org.

Authors

Virginia Nuessle, Study Tour Director

Majd Alwan, Director, CAST

Alla Rubinstein, Program Administrator, IAHSA

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